UTM Timeline: From Pastures to Pedagogy

50 years. A lot has changed since the first students and professors strode across the open, almost undeveloped forests and fields of Erindale College. Fruit stands dotted Mississauga Road, residence students lived in buildings like Hastie House, and The Doors grooved to the top of the charts with Light My Fire. But other things have stood the test of time: shuttle buses still ferry students to the St. George campus; students still gather in the Meeting Place; and the deer still stop traffic on Outer Circle Road.

Take a journey through some of the highlights of Erindale/UTM’s history…

Turtle Island

We wish to acknowledge this land on which the University of Toronto operates. For thousands of years, it has been the traditional land of the Huron-Wendat, the Seneca, and most recently, the Mississaugas of the Credit River. Today, this meeting place is still the home to many Indigenous people from across Turtle Island and we are grateful to have the opportunity to work on this land.

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The Four Corners

The McGill, O’Neil, Schreiber and Sproule families farmed the land where the campus now lies. The intersection of their properties is now where Mississauga Road meets Outer Circle Road.

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Springfield Public School

Many early Erindale children learned the “3R’s” in this building. Formerly known as S.S. #4, this was the third school to serve Erindale Village. Today, this building is known as Alumni House.

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Artist Charlotte M.B Schreiber

Charlotte M.B. Schreiber, working in her studio at Erindale, Ontario. Her home, Lislehurst, is now the official residence of UTM's vice-president and principal.

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St. Peter's Church

This church was once the home of Colonel Peter Adamson in 1825. His home, then called “Toronto House”, was situated on a farm about a mile west of Erindale on the south side of Dundas Street.

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World War I

Looking west on Dundas Road; troops marching off to World War I.

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Early Dundas Street

Looking east on Dundas Street, Erindale ON with St. Peter's Church in background

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Erindale Public School

The brick addition was added to the school to accommodate the growing population. Today, this building is known as Alumni House.

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John McGill family farm

The original farmland where UTM now stands.

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First course offerings at Erindale College

Before the campus opened, Erindale College offered its first courses for a BA degree at T.L. Kennedy Secondary School in Mississauga.

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Thomas Cottage

Before Erindale College built residences, students lived in houses already located on the land when U of T purchased it. There were five all-male houses – Ackworth, Dobratz, McGill, Robinson and Thomas Cottage (shown) – and one female property known as Hastie House.

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Principal D. Carlton Williams

Erindale College's first principal, from 1966 to 1968.

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North Building

Construction began in late fall on the Erindale College building, also referred to as the “preliminary” building, expected to be temporary but used as part of the North Building until 2016.

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First Erindale student

Ken Luckhurst was the first registered student of Erindale College; registrar J.J. Rae "registered" him on the back of an empty pack of cigarettes.

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Erindale College officially opens

Official opening of Erindale College, under Principal D. Carlton Williams, with one “preliminary” building, two tennis courts and 155 students – 101 in general arts and 54 in general science.

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Colman House

Renamed after the first dean of Erindale College (John Colman), this building served as the campus’ first student centre, housing the student union office, the offices of The Erindalian, Radio Erindale, a game and book room, and a makeshift pub known as “Ugly’s.” (photo circa. 1990s)

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Zero Centre

Erindale College hosted an outdoor art exhibit, which included a massive steel structure, titled “Zero Centre” by artist Leonhard Oesterle. The artwork remained on loan to the college and sat outside the North Building for decades. Over the years, students  referred to the structure by many names, including the CIBC logo, the Green Goliath and the Erindale Enigma.

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Principal J. Tuzo Wilson

Erindale’s second principal from 1968 - 1974; Wilson is known worldwide for his scientific research on plate tectonics.

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The Erindalian

In 1969, two Erindale students, Robert Rudolph and Doug Leeies, started the campus’ first newspaper, The Erindalian, with a circulation of about 500.

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Moon rocks

Erindale College hosted the first public showing in Canada of moon rock samples – a 21-gram lump and a teaspoon of moon dust in a vial – from Oct. 11-12, 1969, in the North Building.

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Artist-in-residence

Canadian artist David Blackwood began his five-year term as Erindale College’s first artist-in-residence. Blackwood worked out of a studio in the North Building and lived in the Artist’s Cottage along Principal’s Road.

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Class of 1970

The first graduating class of Erindale College crosses the stage at Convocation Hall.

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Opening of Schreiberwood

Schreiberwood Residence opened, the first of many student housing developments. (Photo circa. 1980's)

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South Building opens

The official opening of South Building. Today, this building is known as the William G. Davis Building.

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Physical fitness

Erindale College’s new gym was completed and opened. Today, this room is known as Gym C.

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