Department of Anthropology

Anthropology is the study of humankind from its beginnings to the present day.  Many disciplines concern themselves with the human, but only anthropology seeks to understand the whole panorama of human existence - in geographic space and evolutionary time - through comparative and holistic study.

The research interests of our full-time faculty members reflect the broad mandate of anthropology as a discipline. We cover the traditional four subfields of anthropology, archaeology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and socio-cultural anthropology; this includes strengths in forensic anthropology and the anthropology of health.

Did you know?

  • Anthropologists find rewarding careers in governmental and international agencies, business and industry, universities and colleges, and many other areas!
  • The word anthropology is derived from the Greek anthropos ("human") and logia ("study").
  • Nothing human is alien to anthropology!

New for Summer 2017! ANT215H5F: How Should One Live? An Introduction to the Anthropology of Ethics

collage of deaf symbol, solar panels, Rastafarian lion flag, all gender symbol, statue of Socrates, and Jainism symbol

Enrol soon! This new course will be taught by Professor Jack Sidnell during the first half of the Summer 2017 term (starting the second week of May)! ANT102H5 is recommended preparation, but there is no required prerequisite.

Few questions are more obviously important than that which Socrates poses in Plato’s Republic: "how should one live?" This course considers the various ways this question has been asked and the answers it has received across a range of very different contexts. Drawing on ethnography as well journalism and documentary film we will consider, for instance, Rastafarianism, Jainism, living "off-grid" in North America, deaf communities in the US, transgenderism, and non-binary gender identity. View the full course description on the UTM Academic Calendar.

New! ANT335H5F Anthropology of Gender (Fall 2017) will feature optional UTM Abroad international learning experience in Tanzania!

Tanzania landscape of trees and grass with mountains in backgroundStudents who enrol in ANT335H5F (Fall 2017 term) will have the opportunity to travel to Tanzania with Professor Sarah Hillewaert to experience the rich cultural landscape and to learn how notions of gender are both locally situated and also shaped by global, religious, and different cultural influences. Funding is available for up to half of the cost of the international component based on financial need.

Visit the UTM International Education Centre's Tanzania - ANT335H5F web page for all the details on the trip, funding, and application process! The application will open via the IEC Tanzania web page (linked above) on May 19, 2017.
 

We are still accepting applications for 2017 UTM Field Schools!

photo and illustration of tin soldier and horse artifact circa 1880
Above: Tin soldier artifact discovered on UTM Campus during Summer 2016 Archaeological Fieldwork Field School. Photo: Trevor Orchard, PhD. Illustration: Murray Clayton, MSc.

Departmental approval is required in order to take these courses and enrolment is limited!

Our field schools take place over two weeks in August (for field sessions) in addition to the Fall 2017 term (for lab classes). August field dates and application information are available on the following pages:

Focus in the Anthropology of Health

Visit our Anthropology of Health page for more information on this exciting new focus (beginning in Fall 2016) which emphasizes the effects of cultural and socioeconomic processes on biological and health outcomes in human populations. Open to all students who have the required prerequisites, whether from an Arts or a Science background.


Download our departmental brochure (PDF file).